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A Qualitative Evaluation of the Acceptability of an Interactive Voice Response System to Enhance Adherence to Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Among People Living with HIV in Ethiopia.

A Qualitative Evaluation of the Acceptability of an Interactive Voice Response System to Enhance Adherence to Isoniazid Preventive Therapy Among People Living with HIV in Ethiopia.
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Daftary A, Hirsch-Moverman Y, Kassie GM, Melaku Z, Gadisa T, Saito S, Howard AA,


Daftary A, Hirsch-Moverman Y, Kassie GM, Melaku Z, Gadisa T, Saito S, Howard AA, (click to view)

Daftary A, Hirsch-Moverman Y, Kassie GM, Melaku Z, Gadisa T, Saito S, Howard AA,

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AIDS and behavior 21(11) 3057-3067 doi 10.1007/s10461-016-1432-8

Abstract

Interactive voice response (IVR) is increasingly used to monitor and promote medication adherence. In 2014, we evaluated patient acceptability toward IVR as part of the ENRICH Study, aimed to enhance adherence to isoniazid preventive therapy for tuberculosis prevention among HIV-positive adults in Ethiopia. Qualitative interviews were completed with 30 participants exposed to 2867 IVR calls, of which 24 % were completely answered. Individualized IVR options, treatment education, and time and cost savings facilitated IVR utilization, whereas poor IVR instruction, network and power malfunctions, one-way communication with providers, and delayed clinic follow-up inhibited utilization. IVR acceptability was complicated by HIV confidentiality, mobile phone access and literacy, and patient-provider trust. Incomplete calls likely reminded patients to take medication but were less likely to capture adherence or side effect data. Simple, automated systems that deliver health messages and triage clinic visits appear to be acceptable in this resource-limited setting.

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