This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Self-Efficacy Reinforcement Stretching Exercise Program to improve osteoarthritis (OA)-related symptoms in older women with OA.
A quasi-experimental design was used in this study.
The experimental group participated in the Self-Efficacy Reinforcement Stretching Exercise Program, a 6-week program composed of stretching exercises and self-efficacy reinforcement strategies, whereas the control group did not. All participants were assessed on pain; joint stiffness; physical function disability; body mass index; depression; and quality of life at the beginning, end, and 4 weeks after the program ended.
After participation, the experimental group had significantly less joint stiffness, physical function disability, and depression scores and significantly higher self-efficacy and quality of life than the control group.
This intervention program led to an improvement in OA-related symptoms, self-efficacy, and quality of life in older women with OA.
The sustained effects of acquired exercise behaviors that persisted up to 4 weeks after the program ended could be of interest to rehabilitation nurses and other healthcare professionals.

References

PubMed