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A systematic review of psychological correlates of HIV testing intention.

A systematic review of psychological correlates of HIV testing intention.
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Evangeli M, Ferris K, Kenney NM, Baker LLE, Jones B, Wroe AL,


Evangeli M, Ferris K, Kenney NM, Baker LLE, Jones B, Wroe AL, (click to view)

Evangeli M, Ferris K, Kenney NM, Baker LLE, Jones B, Wroe AL,

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AIDS care 2017 07 07() 1-10 doi 10.1080/09540121.2017.1344351

Abstract

Undiagnosed HIV infection is associated with onward HIV transmission and delays in accessing HIV care and treatment. As a significant proportion of HIV tests are self-initiated, it is important to assess correlates of the intention to test for HIV. Psychological correlates of HIV testing intention are more likely to be the feasible target of interventions than structural determinants. A systematic review of psychological correlates of HIV testing intention was conducted. Twenty studies were included in the review, covering a range of populations and geographical regions. The most commonly assessed variables were HIV risk perception and HIV knowledge rather than HIV test-specific psychological factors. There was evidence that HIV risk perception and pro-testing attitudes were consistently associated with HIV testing intention across a number of studies. There is a need for longitudinal designs, including experimental studies, allowing for more confident casual inferences to be made. Theoretical, research and practice implications are outlined.

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