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A systematic review on the impact of diabetes mellitus on the ocular surface.

A systematic review on the impact of diabetes mellitus on the ocular surface.
Author Information (click to view)

Shih KC, Lam KS, Tong L,


Shih KC, Lam KS, Tong L, (click to view)

Shih KC, Lam KS, Tong L,

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Nutrition & diabetes 2017 03 207(3) e251 doi 10.1038/nutd.2017.4
Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is associated with extensive morbidity and mortality in any human community. It is well understood that the burden of diabetes is attributed to chronic progressive damage in major end-organs, but it is underappreciated that the most superficial and transparent organ affected by diabetes is the cornea. Different corneal components (epithelium, nerves, immune cells and endothelium) underpin specific systemic complications of diabetes. Just as diabetic retinopathy is a marker of more generalized microvascular disease, corneal nerve changes can predict peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, providing a window of opportunity for early treatment. In addition, alterations of immune cells in corneas suggest an inflammatory component in diabetic complications. Furthermore, impaired corneal epithelial wound healing may also imply more widespread disease. The non-invasiveness and improvement in imaging technology facilitates the emergence of new screening tools. Systemic control of diabetes can improve ocular surface health, possibly aided by anti-inflammatory and vasoprotective agents.

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