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Ability to adjust nocturnal fat oxidation in response to overfeeding predicts 5-year weight gain in adults.

Ability to adjust nocturnal fat oxidation in response to overfeeding predicts 5-year weight gain in adults.
Author Information (click to view)

Rynders CA, Bergouignan A, Kealey E, Bessesen DH,


Rynders CA, Bergouignan A, Kealey E, Bessesen DH, (click to view)

Rynders CA, Bergouignan A, Kealey E, Bessesen DH,

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Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) 25(5) 873-880 doi 10.1002/oby.21807
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
To determine whether metabolic responses to short-term overfeeding predict longitudinal changes in body weight.

METHODS
Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure (EE) and substrate utilization were measured at baseline in a room calorimeter following 3 days of eucaloric and hypercaloric feeding (40% excess) in a sample of lean adults (n: 34; age: 28 ± 2 y; BMI: 22 ± 3 kg/m(2) ). Body mass and fat mass (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) were measured annually for 5 years. Regression analyses examined whether changes in EE and fuel use with overfeeding predicted body weight and composition changes over 5 years.

RESULTS
Overfeeding increased EE and reduced fat oxidation when examined over the 24-hour, waking, and nocturnal periods. Absolute change in body mass over 5 years was 3.0 ± 0.6 kg (average rate of change = 0.7 ± 0.1 kg/y, P < 0.001). Lower nocturnal (but not 24-hour or waking) fat oxidation (r = -0.42, P = 0.01) and EE (r = -0.33, P = 0.05) with overfeeding were the strongest predictors of 5-year weight gain. When adjusted for covariates, changes in nocturnal fat oxidation and EE with overfeeding predicted 41% of the variance in weight change (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS
Failure to maintain fat oxidation at night following a period of overfeeding appears to be associated with a metabolic phenotype favoring weight gain.

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