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Accuracy of Noninvasive Fibrosis Scores in Predicting the Presence of Fibrosis in Patients after Liver Transplantation.

Accuracy of Noninvasive Fibrosis Scores in Predicting the Presence of Fibrosis in Patients after Liver Transplantation.
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Kabbany MN, Conjeevaram Selvakumar PK, Guirguis J, Rivas J, Akras Z, Lopez R, Hanouneh I, Eghtesad B, Alkhouri N,


Kabbany MN, Conjeevaram Selvakumar PK, Guirguis J, Rivas J, Akras Z, Lopez R, Hanouneh I, Eghtesad B, Alkhouri N, (click to view)

Kabbany MN, Conjeevaram Selvakumar PK, Guirguis J, Rivas J, Akras Z, Lopez R, Hanouneh I, Eghtesad B, Alkhouri N,

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Experimental and clinical transplantation : official journal of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation 2017 09 26() doi 10.6002/ect.2016.0340
Abstract
OBJECTIVES
Several scoring systems have been developed to noninvasively predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. Hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are the 2 most common indications for orthotopic liver transplant and are associated with disease recurrence that can lead to fibrosis progression. Here, we evaluated the performance of commonly used fibrosis scores in assessing the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients after orthotopic liver transplant.

MATERIALS AND METHODS
Our study consisted of consecutive patients with hepatitis C virus or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease who underwent a liver biopsy after transplant and had laboratory measurements within 1 week of biopsy. Graft fibrosis was determined by an experienced pathologist (stage F0-F4). Advanced fibrosis was defined as stage F3-F4. The following fibrosis scores were calculated for each patient: aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase ratio, aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index, and fibrosis-4 index.

RESULTS
We analyzed 93 patients with median age of 59 years (25th and 75th percentile of 53 and 64 y) and median body mass index of 31.8 kg/m² (25th and 75th percentile of 27 and 37.6 kg/m²). Of total patients, 41 (44%) were diabetic. Median time to liver biopsy posttransplant was 27.7 months (25th and 75 percentile of 10.8 and 59.9 mo). We found that 54 patients (58%) had no fibrosis, 15 (16.1%) had F1, 8 (8.6%) had F2, 7 (7.5%) had F3, and 9 (9.7%) had F4. Overall, advanced fibrosis (F3-F4) was present in 16 patients. Aspartate aminotransferase/alanine amino-transferase ratio, aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index, and fibrosis-4 index were not significantly different between patients with and without advanced fibrosis (all P > .05). The calculated fibrosis scores had poor diagnostic accuracy for presence of advanced fibrosis posttransplant.

CONCLUSIONS
Commonly used liver fibrosis scores are not accurate in predicting the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients after liver transplant.

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