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Aging-Related Disease Risks among Young Thyroid Cancer Survivors.

Aging-Related Disease Risks among Young Thyroid Cancer Survivors.
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Blackburn BE, Ganz PA, Rowe K, Snyder J, Wan Y, Deshmukh V, Newman M, Fraser A, Smith K, Herget K, Kim J, Kirchhoff AC, Porucznik C, Hanson H, Monroe M, Hashibe M,


Blackburn BE, Ganz PA, Rowe K, Snyder J, Wan Y, Deshmukh V, Newman M, Fraser A, Smith K, Herget K, Kim J, Kirchhoff AC, Porucznik C, Hanson H, Monroe M, Hashibe M, (click to view)

Blackburn BE, Ganz PA, Rowe K, Snyder J, Wan Y, Deshmukh V, Newman M, Fraser A, Smith K, Herget K, Kim J, Kirchhoff AC, Porucznik C, Hanson H, Monroe M, Hashibe M,

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Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology 2017 11 2226(12) 1695-1704 doi 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-17-0623

Abstract

Background: Thyroid cancer is the most rapidly increasing cancer in the United States, affects a young population, has high survival, and is one of the most common cancers in people under age 40. The aim of this study was to examine the risks of aging-related diseases in a statewide sample of thyroid cancer survivors who were diagnosed <40 years compared with those diagnosed ≥40 and a cancer-free sample.Methods: Thyroid cancer survivors diagnosed 1997 to 2012 were matched to up to 5 cancer-free individuals on birth year, sex, birth state, using the statewide Utah Population Database. Medical records were used to identify disease diagnoses stratified over three time periods: 1 to 5, >5 to 10, and 10+ years after cancer diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios with adjustment on matching factors, race, body mass index, and Charlson Comorbidity Index.Results: There were 3,706 thyroid cancer survivors and 15,587 matched cancer-free individuals (1,365 cases diagnosed <40 years old). Both age groups had increased risks for multiple circulatory health conditions 1 to 5 years after cancer diagnosis compared with cancer-free individuals. Survivors <40 had a higher risk of hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and nutritional deficiencies.Conclusions: Increased risks for diseases associated with aging were observed for both age groups, with younger thyroid cancer survivors having higher risks for select diseases.Impact: As thyroid cancer survivors in this study were found to have increased risks for aging-related diseases, future studies are needed to assess what can be done to reduce the increased risks of these long-term health effects. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(12); 1695-704. ©2017 AACR.

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