For a study, the researchers sought to find a link between PCI and all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart failure who had left ventricular systolic dysfunction and functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). A total of 1,483 patients were enrolled in the study, with 39.5% (n=586) having moderate-to-severe FMR. Using a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model, the connection between PCI therapy and all-cause mortality was studied. Furthermore, nonrandom treatment assignment was accounted for using propensity score matching. After a median follow-up of 3.1 years, the cumulative rate of all-cause mortality among those with none-to-mild FMR was comparable (10.1% vs 14.2%), with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 0.731 (95% CI 0.438 to 1.221, p=0.232). After a median follow-up of 2.9 years, the cumulative rate of all-cause death in patients with moderate-to-severe FMR was lower in the PCI group (20.4% vs 31.6%), with an adjusted HR of 0.660 (95% CI 0.469 to 0.929, p=0.017). Propensity matching validated the outcome (HR 0.596, 95% CI 0.363 to 0.977, p=0.038). Regardless of age, gender, cause for admission, presence of diabetes mellitus, left ventricular ejection fraction value, left main and 3-vessels disease, the mortality benefit associated with PCI treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe FMR remained consistent. Finally, PCI treatment was linked to reducing all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and moderate-to-severe FMR. To corroborate the outcomes, randomized clinical trials were required.

 

Source:www.ajconline.org/article/S0002-9149(22)00112-6/fulltext