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Assessing Change in Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections During the Fourth Epidemic – China, September 2015-August 2016.

Assessing Change in Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infections During the Fourth Epidemic – China, September 2015-August 2016.
Author Information (click to view)

Xiang N, Li X, Ren R, Wang D, Zhou S, Greene CM, Song Y, Zhou L, Yang L, Davis CT, Zhang Y, Wang Y, Zhao J, Li X, Iuliano AD, Havers F, Olsen SJ, Uyeki TM, Azziz-Baumgartner E, Trock S, Liu B, Sui H, Huang X, Zhang Y, Ni D, Feng Z, Shu Y, Li Q,


Xiang N, Li X, Ren R, Wang D, Zhou S, Greene CM, Song Y, Zhou L, Yang L, Davis CT, Zhang Y, Wang Y, Zhao J, Li X, Iuliano AD, Havers F, Olsen SJ, Uyeki TM, Azziz-Baumgartner E, Trock S, Liu B, Sui H, Huang X, Zhang Y, Ni D, Feng Z, Shu Y, Li Q, (click to view)

Xiang N, Li X, Ren R, Wang D, Zhou S, Greene CM, Song Y, Zhou L, Yang L, Davis CT, Zhang Y, Wang Y, Zhao J, Li X, Iuliano AD, Havers F, Olsen SJ, Uyeki TM, Azziz-Baumgartner E, Trock S, Liu B, Sui H, Huang X, Zhang Y, Ni D, Feng Z, Shu Y, Li Q,

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MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report 2016 12 1665(49) 1390-1394 doi 10.15585/mmwr.mm6549a2
Abstract

Since human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus were first reported by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC) in March 2013 (1), mainland China has experienced four influenza A(H7N9) virus epidemics. Prior investigations demonstrated that age and sex distribution, clinical features, and exposure history of A(H7N9) virus human infections reported during the first three epidemics were similar (2). In this report, epidemiology and virology data from the most recent, fourth epidemic (September 2015-August 2016) were compared with those from the three earlier epidemics. Whereas age and sex distribution and exposure history in the fourth epidemic were similar to those in the first three epidemics, the fourth epidemic demonstrated a greater proportion of infected persons living in rural areas, a continued spread of the virus to new areas, and a longer epidemic period. The genetic markers of mammalian adaptation and antiviral resistance remained similar across each epidemic, and viruses from the fourth epidemic remained antigenically well matched to current candidate vaccine viruses. Although there is no evidence of increased human-to-human transmissibility of A(H7N9) viruses, the continued geographic spread, identification of novel reassortant viruses, and pandemic potential of the virus underscore the importance of rigorous A(H7N9) virus surveillance and continued risk assessment in China and neighboring countries.

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