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Associations between HIV-related stigma, self-esteem, social support, and depressive symptoms in Namibia.

Associations between HIV-related stigma, self-esteem, social support, and depressive symptoms in Namibia.
Author Information (click to view)

Kalomo EN,


Kalomo EN, (click to view)

Kalomo EN,

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Aging & mental health 2017 10 11() 1-7 doi 10.1080/13607863.2017.1387763

Abstract
OBJECTIVE
The current study sought to investigate the association between HIV-related stigma, self-esteem, social support, and depression of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) in Namibia.

METHOD
Purposive sampling was used to recruit a total of 124 men and women living with HIV/AIDS in the Katima Mulilo region of northern Namibia. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect information on demographics, self-esteem, social support, HIV-related stigma, and depression.

RESULTS
Correlation analysis revealed that HIV-related stigma, self-esteem, and social support were all significantly correlated with depression. Further, Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression analysis indicated that HIV-related stigma was the largest risk factor and self-esteem was the largest protective factor with respect to depressive symptoms.

DISCUSSION
Findings indicated the necessity of appropriate assessment and intervention for psychosocial distress among PLWHA. Helping professionals should design evidence-based interventions that address individual and societal challenges that impact people living with HIV and AIDS.

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