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Associations between self-reported lifetime history of traumatic brain injuries and current disability assessment in a population sample of Canadian adults.

Associations between self-reported lifetime history of traumatic brain injuries and current disability assessment in a population sample of Canadian adults.
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Ilie G, Adlaf EM, Mann RE, Ialomiteanu A, Hamilton H, Rehm J, Asbridge M, Cusimano MD,


Ilie G, Adlaf EM, Mann RE, Ialomiteanu A, Hamilton H, Rehm J, Asbridge M, Cusimano MD, (click to view)

Ilie G, Adlaf EM, Mann RE, Ialomiteanu A, Hamilton H, Rehm J, Asbridge M, Cusimano MD,

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PloS one 2018 01 0513(1) e0188908 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0188908
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
This study describes the association between history of lifetime traumatic brain injury (TBI) and current disabling functional restrictions among Ontario adults.

SETTING AND DESIGN
A two-stage rolling cross-sectional sample of 6,048 adults aged 18 to 93 were interviewed by computer assisted telephone interviewing between 2011-2013 regarding their mental health and substance use in Ontario, Canada. TBI criteria were defined by loss of consciousness for minimum five minutes or at least one overnight hospitalization. Dimensions of functionality restrictions in the last 30 days were measured with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS).

RESULTS
The estimated mean for global disability in this sample of Ontario adults was 2.75 (SD = 5.4, range 0-40). The estimated means of global disability for individuals who reported a history of lifetime TBI was 4.16 (SD = 7.12) and compared with 2.46 (SD = 4.98) for individuals who never had a TBI (p < 0.001). Adults with a history of lifetime TBI had greater odds of global and item disability including restricted cognition, decreased self-care, difficulties with social relationships, fewer life activities and reduced participation in society compared to adults without a history of TBI (p < 0.001), even after adjusting for values of age, sex, marital status, household income and education. CONCLUSION
The co-occurrence of history of lifetime TBI with self-reported disability within the past 30 days provide evidence that careful consideration, planning and understanding of short and long term health needs of TBI survivors are critical.

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