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Associations Between Sexual Risk-Related Behaviors and School-Based Education on HIV and Condom Use for Adolescent Sexual Minority Males and Their Non-Sexual-Minority Peers.

Associations Between Sexual Risk-Related Behaviors and School-Based Education on HIV and Condom Use for Adolescent Sexual Minority Males and Their Non-Sexual-Minority Peers.
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Rasberry CN, Condron DS, Lesesne CA, Hocevar Adkins S, Sheremenko G, Kroupa E,


Rasberry CN, Condron DS, Lesesne CA, Hocevar Adkins S, Sheremenko G, Kroupa E, (click to view)

Rasberry CN, Condron DS, Lesesne CA, Hocevar Adkins S, Sheremenko G, Kroupa E,

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LGBT health 2017 12 14() doi 10.1089/lgbt.2017.0111

Abstract
PURPOSE
With HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates disproportionately high among adolescent sexual minority males (ASMM), it is important to understand how school-based sexual health education may relate to sexual risk-related behavior among this population. This analysis explores reported HIV/AIDS- and condom-related education and sexual risk-related behaviors among ASMM and their adolescent non-sexual-minority male (non-ASMM) peers.

METHODS
Students (n = 11,681) from seven Florida high schools completed paper-and-pencil questionnaires. A matched analytic sample of ASMM and non-ASMM students was created by using propensity score-matching techniques (n = 572). Logistic regressions controlling for individual and school characteristics examined reporting having been taught about AIDS or HIV in school, having been taught in school about using condoms, condom use at last sex, HIV/STD testing, and associations between these variables.

RESULTS
Compared with matched non-ASMM peers, ASMM students were less likely to report having been taught about AIDS or HIV in school (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58, P = 0.04) and having used a condom at last sex (OR = 0.39, P < 0.01), but were more likely to report having been tested for HIV or STDs (OR = 1.88, P = 0.02). There were no significant differences for reporting having been taught in school about using condoms. Among non-ASMM, reporting having been taught in school about using condoms was associated with a greater likelihood of condom use at last sex (OR = 4.78, P < 0.01); this was not seen for ASMM. CONCLUSIONS
Differential reports of receiving HIV/AIDS education and differential associations between condom-related education and condom use in ASMM and non-ASMM suggest that sexual health education in schools may not be resonating with ASMM and non-ASMM in the same way.

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