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At-Risk Alcohol Use is Associated with Antiretroviral Treatment Nonadherence Among Adults Living with HIV/AIDS.

At-Risk Alcohol Use is Associated with Antiretroviral Treatment Nonadherence Among Adults Living with HIV/AIDS.
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Paolillo EW, Gongvatana A, Umlauf A, Letendre SL, Moore DJ,


Paolillo EW, Gongvatana A, Umlauf A, Letendre SL, Moore DJ, (click to view)

Paolillo EW, Gongvatana A, Umlauf A, Letendre SL, Moore DJ,

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Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research 2017 07 05() doi 10.1111/acer.13433

Abstract
BACKGROUND
Alcohol use is a risk factor for nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA); however, differences in ART adherence across levels of alcohol use are unclear. This study examined whether "at-risk" alcohol use, defined by National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism guidelines, was associated with ART nonadherence among PLWHA.

METHODS
Participants were 535 HIV-infected adults enrolled in studies at the HIV Neurobehavioral Research Program. ART nonadherence was identified by either self-reported missed dose or plasma viral load detectability (≥50 copies/ml). Potential covariates for multivariable logistic regression included demographics, depression, and substance use disorders.

RESULTS
Using a stepwise model selection procedure, we found that at-risk alcohol use (OR = 0.64; p = 0.032) and low education (OR = 1.09 per 1 year increase in education; p = 0.009) significantly predict lower ART adherence.

CONCLUSIONS
A greater focus on the treatment of at-risk alcohol use may improve ART adherence among HIV-infected persons.

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