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Barriers and facilitators of HIV vaccine and prevention study participation among Young Black MSM and transwomen in New York City.

Barriers and facilitators of HIV vaccine and prevention study participation among Young Black MSM and transwomen in New York City.
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Richardson S, Seekaew P, Koblin B, Vazquez T, Nandi V, Tieu HV,


Richardson S, Seekaew P, Koblin B, Vazquez T, Nandi V, Tieu HV, (click to view)

Richardson S, Seekaew P, Koblin B, Vazquez T, Nandi V, Tieu HV,

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PloS one 2017 07 1912(7) e0181702 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0181702

Abstract
BACKGROUND
Black men who have sex with men (MSM), and Transwomen (TW) shoulder disproportionate burden of HIV. However, they are unrepresented in HIV vaccine trials. We investigated the perceptions of that factors associated with HIV vaccine trials participation among Black MSM and TW in New York.

METHODS
Self-administered online questionnaires were administered to 18-29 years of NYC residents who identified as Black MSM and TW, assessing demographics, awareness and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials, barriers and facilitators associated with willingness, and sexual behaviors. Frequency summation was performed to determine barriers and facilitators, and logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors association with expressed willingness.

RESULTS
Black MSM and TW who reported engaging in risk behaviors had a 61% lower likelihood of participating in HIV vaccine trials when compared to those who did not report engaging in any risk behavior. Facilitators associated with trial participation were: cash compensation, confidentiality regarding participation, public transportation vouchers, gift cards, and food or grocery vouchers as potential facilitators for trial participation. Conversely, fear of side effects from the vaccine, concerns about testing positive on routine HIV testing due to an HIV vaccine, limited knowledge of research trials, and fear of being judged as HIV-positive were perceived as barriers.

CONCLUSIONS
These findings provided insights into the considerations and perceptions of Black MSM and TW towards HIV vaccine trials. However, further studies are needed to delineate the complex mechanisms underlying the decision-making process and establish approaches to increase study participation in this population.

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