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Bifidobacterium adolescentis (DSM 20083) and Lactobacillus casei (Lafti L26-DSL): Probiotics Able to Block the In Vitro Adherence of Rotavirus in MA104 Cells.

Bifidobacterium adolescentis (DSM 20083) and Lactobacillus casei (Lafti L26-DSL): Probiotics Able to Block the In Vitro Adherence of Rotavirus in MA104 Cells.
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Fernandez-Duarte KP, Olaya-Galán NN, Salas-Cárdenas SP, Lopez-Rozo J, Gutierrez-Fernandez MF,


Fernandez-Duarte KP, Olaya-Galán NN, Salas-Cárdenas SP, Lopez-Rozo J, Gutierrez-Fernandez MF, (click to view)

Fernandez-Duarte KP, Olaya-Galán NN, Salas-Cárdenas SP, Lopez-Rozo J, Gutierrez-Fernandez MF,

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Probiotics and antimicrobial proteins 2017 04 21() doi 10.1007/s12602-017-9277-7
Abstract

Rotavirus is the leading worldwide cause of gastroenteritis in children under five years of age. Even though there are some available vaccines to prevent the disease, there are limited strategies for challenging diarrhea induced by rotavirus infection. For this reason, researchers are constantly searching for other approaches to control diarrhea by means of probiotics. In order to demonstrate the ability of some probiotic bacteria to interfere with the in vitro rotavirus infection in MA104 cells, strains of Lactobacillus sp. and Bifidobacterium sp. were tested in MA104 cells before the viral infection. As a preliminary assay, a blocking effect treatment was performed with viable bacteria. In this screening assay, four of initial ten bacteria showed a slight reduction of the viral infection (measured by percentage of infection). L. casei (Lafti L26-DSL), L. fermentum(ATCC 9338), B. adolescentis (DSM 20083), and B. bifidum (ATCC 11863) were used in further experiments. Three different treatments were tested in order to evaluate protein-based metabolites obtained from mentioned bacteria: (i) cell exposure to the protein-based metabolites before viral infection, (ii) exposure to protein-based metabolites after viral infection, and (iii) co-incubation of the virus and protein-based metabolites before viral infection to the cell culture. The best effect performed by protein-based metabolites was observed during the co-incubation assay of the virus and protein-based metabolites before adding them into the cell culture. The results showed 25 and 37% of infection in the presence of L. casei and B. adolescentis respectively. These results suggest that the antiviral effect may be occurring directly with the viral particle instead of making a blocking effect of the cellular receptors that are needed for the viral entrance.

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