To evaluate the response of cardiovascular risk factors to the treatment of climacteric symptoms.
In this prospective study, women reporting climacteric symptoms were randomized to 3 months of treatment with either acupuncture (n = 19), phytoestrogens (75 mg soy isoflavones, BID; n = 22), or low-dose hormone therapy (HT; 0.3 mg conjugated equine oestrogens plus 1.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate; n = 20). Greene’s climacteric scale, blood pressure (BP), lipids, glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were assessed before and after treatment. Observed changes were compared by analysis of variance.
HT and acupuncture reduced Greene climacteric score to a similar extent, but the effect of phytoestrogens was significantly lower (P < 0.05). With acupuncture, systolic (-7.4 ± 15.3 mm Hg; P < 0.05) and diastolic BP (-8.3 ± 7.7mm Hg; P < 0.01) decreased, and the same occurred with phytoestrogens (-8.4 ± 9.0 mm Hg [P < 0.01] and -6.6 ± 7.9 mm Hg [P < 0.01]). Neither BP systolic (1.9 ± 17.5 mm Hg) nor BP diastolic (-1.4 ± 9.6 mm Hg) changed during HT. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased with phytoestrogens (-9.9 ± 19.6 mg/dL; P < 0.05), and triglycerides increased with both HT (34.5 ± 12.2 mg/dL; P < 0.01) and phytoestrogens (17.41 ± 24.4 mg/dL; P < 0.01). A slight but significant increase in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (0.14 ± 0.5; P < 0.05) was observed after HT.
Treatment of climacteric symptoms with acupuncture and phytoestrogens, but not HT, is associated with a clear BP reduction, and phytoestrogens with potentially positive alterations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level.
EudractCT Number 2008-006053-41. : Video Summary:http://links.lww.com/MENO/A637.

References

PubMed