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Brain white matter plasticity and functional reorganization underlying the central pathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia.

Brain white matter plasticity and functional reorganization underlying the central pathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia.
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Tian T, Guo L, Xu J, Zhang S, Shi J, Liu C, Qin Y, Zhu W,


Tian T, Guo L, Xu J, Zhang S, Shi J, Liu C, Qin Y, Zhu W, (click to view)

Tian T, Guo L, Xu J, Zhang S, Shi J, Liu C, Qin Y, Zhu W,

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Scientific reports 2016 Oct 256() 36030 doi 10.1038/srep36030
Abstract

Peripheral nerve damage does not fully explain the pathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Central nervous system changes can follow trigeminal nerve dysfunction. We hypothesized that brain white matter and functional connectivity changes in TN patients were involved in pain perception, modulation, the cognitive-affective system, and motor function; moreover, changes in functional reorganization were correlated with white matter alterations. Twenty left TN patients and twenty-two healthy controls were studied. Diffusion kurtosis imaging was analyzed to extract diffusion and kurtosis parameters, and functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping was used to explore the functional reorganization in the brain. In the patient group, we found lower axial kurtosis and higher axial diffusivity in tracts participated in sensory, cognitive-affective, and modulatory aspects of pain, such as the corticospinal tract, superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, cingulated gyrus, forceps major and uncinate fasciculus. Patients exhibited complex FCD reorganization of hippocampus, striatum, thalamus, precentral gyrus, precuneus, prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobule in multiple modulatory networks that played crucial roles in pain perception, modulation, cognitive-affective system, and motor function. Further, the correlated structural-functional changes may be responsible for the persistence of long-term recurrent pain and sensory-related dysfunction in TN.

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