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Cardiovascular disease risk among Chinese antiretroviral-naïve adults with advanced HIV disease.

Cardiovascular disease risk among Chinese antiretroviral-naïve adults with advanced HIV disease.
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Guo F, Hsieh E, Lv W, Han Y, Xie J, Li Y, Song X, Li T,


Guo F, Hsieh E, Lv W, Han Y, Xie J, Li Y, Song X, Li T, (click to view)

Guo F, Hsieh E, Lv W, Han Y, Xie J, Li Y, Song X, Li T,

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BMC infectious diseases 2017 04 2017(1) 287 doi 10.1186/s12879-017-2358-0

Abstract
BACKGROUND
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients, however little is known about the burden of CVD among this population in Asia. We sought to quantify prevalence of CVD risk factors, 10-year CVD risk, and patterns of CVD risk factor treatment in a group of individuals with HIV in China.

METHODS
We retrospectively analyzed baseline data from treatment-naïve HIV-infected adults enrolled in two multicenter clinical trials in China. Data regarding CVD risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and obesity were assessed. The Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) risk scores were calculated to estimate 10-year CVD risk. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD) Risk Score was used to identify individuals meeting criteria for lipid-lowering therapy.

RESULTS
In total, 973 patients were included in the analysis. Mean age was 36.0 ± 10.2 years and 74.2% were men. The most common CVD risk factors were dyslipidemia (51.7%) and smoking (23.7%). Prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and obesity were 8.4%, 4.6% and 1.0%, respectively. Over 65% of patients had at least one CVD risk factor. The prevalence of 10-year risk of CVD ≥10% was 4.5% based upon FRS and was 3.3% based upon D:A:D risk score. Few patients with dyslipidemia, hypertension or diabetes were on treatment.

CONCLUSIONS
CVD risk factors are common but under-treated among Chinese treatment-naïve individuals with HIV. Future interventions should focus on training HIV providers to appropriately recognize and manage CVD risk factors during routine clinical assessments.

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