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Catastrophizing, Solicitous Responses From Significant Others and Function in Individuals with Neuropathic Pain, Osteoarthritis or Spinal Pain in the General Population.

Catastrophizing, Solicitous Responses From Significant Others and Function in Individuals with Neuropathic Pain, Osteoarthritis or Spinal Pain in the General Population.
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Glette M, Landmark T, Jensen MP, Woodhouse A, Butler S, Borchgrevink PC, Stiles TC,


Glette M, Landmark T, Jensen MP, Woodhouse A, Butler S, Borchgrevink PC, Stiles TC, (click to view)

Glette M, Landmark T, Jensen MP, Woodhouse A, Butler S, Borchgrevink PC, Stiles TC,

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The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society 2018 03 29() pii S1526-5900(18)30121-4
Abstract

That certain psychological factors are negatively associated with function in patients with chronic pain is well established. However, few studies have evaluated these factors in individuals with chronic pain from the general population. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the unique associations between catastrophizing and perceived solicitous responses and psychological function, physical function and insomnia severity in individuals with neuropathic pain, osteoarthritis or spinal pain in the general population and to (2) determine if diagnosis moderates the associations found. Five-hundred-and-fifty-one individuals from the general population underwent examinations with a physician and physiotherapist, and a total of 334 individuals were diagnosed with either neuropathic pain (n=34), osteoarthritis (n=78) or spinal pain (n=222). Results showed that catastrophizing was significantly associated with reduced psychological and physical function, explaining 24% and 2% of variance respectively, while both catastrophizing and perceived solicitous responding were significantly and uniquely associated with insomnia severity, explaining 8% of the variance. Perceived solicitous responding was significantly negatively associated with insomnia severity. Moderator analyses indicated that (1) the association between catastrophizing and psychological function was greater among individuals with spinal pain and neuropathic pain than those with osteoarthritis and (2) the association between catastrophizing and insomnia was greater among individuals with spinal pain and osteoarthritis than those with neuropathic pain. No statistically significant interactions including perceived solicitous responses were found. The findings support earlier findings of an association between catastrophizing and function among individuals with chronic pain in the general population, and suggest that diagnosis may serve a moderating role in some of these associations.

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