Recent Features

Talking to Teens About Vaccination | Feature

A recent survey suggests that although the vast majority of teenagers and their parents believe it is important for all teens to be vaccinated as recommended by the CDC, vaccination rates among teens are less than optimal. The survey sheds some light on why these rates fall short of Healthy People 2020 goals.

Things doctors should not do—like attacking their nurses | Feature

Do not [allegedly] assault the nurses. A former nurse at a surgery center affiliated with Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles is suing an ophthalmologist who, she

Creating Efficiency in the Patient Journey | Feature

The transformation to value-based care has placed tremendous focus on delivery of care as it relates to improving patient outcomes, quality, and safety. And for good reason;

Expert-Based Opinions: A Supplement to, Not a Replacement for, Evidence-Based Content | Feature

Nationally recognized and highly regarded health systems have a variety of ways to expand the reach of their “special sauce.” For some, it’s to launch outpatient centers

Information Rx: The Missing Piece of Quality Care | Feature

The vast majority of healthcare takes place outside of a physician’s office. Consumers often care for themselves when they have acute problems, such as colds and the

#PWChat Recap: 1-Year Follow-Up on Healthcare Under President Trump | Feature

The #PWChat series rolled on with another informative discussion with co-host Linda Girgis, MD. We discussed where we now stand with TrumpCare since the version we knew a

Things medical personnel should not do | Feature

Here are some tips from an experienced former provider—me. Nude Pictures… Do not take nude pictures of fellow employees. A woman unit secretary in the operating room

Disparities Discovered in Management of Brain Metastases | Feature

Management of brain metastases typically includes radiotherapy (RT) with conventional fractionation and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). For the 20% of cancer patients who will develop brain metastases, optimal

#PWChat Recap: Healthcare Predictions/Expectations for 2018 | Feature

The #PWChat series continued with another informative discussion with co-host Linda Girgis, MD, on the biggest predictions and expectations in healthcare for 2018. Topics discussed included predicted healthcare legislation

Comparing Ventilation Approaches for Pneumonia | Feature

Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of hospitalization in US, resulting in more than 1 million admissions annually. Roughly 60% of patients with severe pneumonia develop acute

Robotically Assisted PCI for Complex CAD | Feature

A comparison of robotically assisted PCI (R-PCI) with manually completed PCI in patients with complex coronary artery disease (CAD) demonstrates the feasibility, safety, and high technical success of R-PCI in this patient population.

Going off the deep end about water | Feature

The latest water craze has generated a lot of discussion. The New York Times reported that some people in California [where else?] have started drinking “raw water”

#PWChat Recap: Exercise as Medicine (Part III) | Feature

Physicians’ Weekly, along with Greg Wells, PhD, recently co-hosted the third installment of the #PWChat series on the topic of “Exercise as Medicine.” The topics covered include the

Ordering unnecessary laboratory tests continues to be a problem | Feature

Unnecessary testing wastes money and can lead to further testing. Why does it occur? Almost 60% of medical personnel surveyed at a large academic medical center believed

Surgeon sued for talking on cell phone during an operation | Feature

A surgeon took a Spanish language proficiency test while performing varicose vein surgery on a 70-year-old woman. The doctor said he had to take the test during

OTC Medications for Diabetics: 7 Considerations | Feature

Many over-the-counter medications contain carbohydrates that can affect blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. When recommending OTC medications to this patient population, clinicians can consider seven key points.

Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust | Feature

"The public is losing their trust in us. They see us as driven for profit. They feel we don’t listen to their concerns anymore and don’t care what they want or need."

Filing a Claim | Feature

View Cartoon “Press 1 to file a new claim. Press 2 to check on a claim. Press 3 to re-file a claim. Press 4 to scream in

Changing Behaviors in HIV-Infected Smokers | Feature

A meta-analysis suggests that targeted behavioral smoking cessation interventions appear to help HIV-infected smokers kick their habit. Patients who attend more sessions are more likely to succeed in quitting smoking.

#PWChat Recap: Why Doctors Are Losing the Public’s Trust, Part II | Feature

Physician’s Weekly co-hosted another installment of the #PWChat series on Wednesday, Dec. 13, with Linda Girgis, MD, based on her blog post on why doctors are losing the public’s

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