WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Age-adjusted death rates decreased for Hispanic adults from 2000 through 2017, while for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adults, the rates have remained stable since 2011-2012, according to a July data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics.

Sally C. Curtin and Elizabeth Arias, Ph.D., from the National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Maryland, describe trends in age-adjusted death rates from 2000 through 2017 for Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black adults aged 25 years and older.

The researchers found that from 2000 through 2017, there was a 21 percent decrease in the age-adjusted death rate for Hispanic adults aged 25 years and older (from 995.1 to 784.4 per 100,000 standard population). For non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adults aged 25 years and older, age-adjusted death rates declined from 2000 to 2011-2012 and then remained stable through 2017. The difference in age-adjusted death rates between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanic adults aged 25 years and older widened between 2000 and 2017, while there was a narrowing in the difference between non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adults. Between 2012 and 2017, there was an increase in death rates for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adults aged 25 to 44 years.

“The mortality advantage for Hispanic adults has endured through 2017 and has been increasing with respect to non-Hispanic white adults,” the authors write.

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