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Cervical cancer incidence after up to 20 years of observation among women with HIV.

Cervical cancer incidence after up to 20 years of observation among women with HIV.
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Massad LS, Hessol NA, Darragh TM, Minkoff H, Colie C, Wright RL, Cohen M, Seaberg EC,


Massad LS, Hessol NA, Darragh TM, Minkoff H, Colie C, Wright RL, Cohen M, Seaberg EC, (click to view)

Massad LS, Hessol NA, Darragh TM, Minkoff H, Colie C, Wright RL, Cohen M, Seaberg EC,

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International journal of cancer 2017 07 17141(8) 1561-1565 doi 10.1002/ijc.30866

Abstract

To estimate the incidence of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) across up to 21 years of follow-up among women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to compare it to that among HIV-uninfected women, we reviewed ICC diagnoses from a 20-year multi-site U.S. cohort study of HIV infected and uninfected women who had Pap testing every 6 months. Incidence rates were calculated and compared to those in HIV-negative women. Incidence ratios standardized to age-, sex-, race-, and calendar-year specific population rates were calculated. After a median follow-up of 12.3 years, four ICCs were confirmed in HIV seropositive women, only one in the last 10 years of observation, and none in seronegative women. The ICC incidence rate did not differ significantly by HIV status (HIV seronegative: 0/100,000 person-years vs. HIV seropositive: 19.5/100,000 person-years; p = 0.53). The standardized incidence ratio for the HIV-infected WIHS participants was 3.31 (95% CI: 0.90, 8.47; p = 0.07). Although marginally more common in women without HIV, for those with HIV in a prevention program, ICC does not emerge as a major threat as women age.

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