Advertisement

 

 

Chronic hepatitis B infection and non-hepatocellular cancers: A hospital registry-based, case-control study.

Chronic hepatitis B infection and non-hepatocellular cancers: A hospital registry-based, case-control study.
Author Information (click to view)

An J, Kim JW, Shim JH, Han S, Yu CS, Choe J, Lee D, Kim KM, Lim YS, Chung YH, Lee YS, Suh DJ, Kim JH, Lee HC,


An J, Kim JW, Shim JH, Han S, Yu CS, Choe J, Lee D, Kim KM, Lim YS, Chung YH, Lee YS, Suh DJ, Kim JH, Lee HC, (click to view)

An J, Kim JW, Shim JH, Han S, Yu CS, Choe J, Lee D, Kim KM, Lim YS, Chung YH, Lee YS, Suh DJ, Kim JH, Lee HC,

Advertisement

PloS one 2018 03 1513(3) e0193232 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0193232
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Prior epidemiological evidences suggest that hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is linked to cancers other than hepatocellular carcinoma. This prospective hospital registry-based case-control study aimed to investigate the sero-epidemiological association between chronic HBV infection and various types of cancer.

METHODS
95,034 patients with first-diagnosed non-hepatocellular malignancy in a tertiary hospital between 2007 and 2014; and 118,891 non-cancer individuals as controls from a health promotion center were included. Cases and controls were compared for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity by conditional regression with adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status and cholesterol level in both genders.

RESULTS
An analysis of matched data indicated significant associations of HBV infection with lymphoma (adjusted odds ratio[AOR] 1.53 [95% CI 1.12-2.09] in men and 3.04 [1.92-4.82] in women) and biliary cancer (2.59[1.98-3.39] in men and 1.71[1.16-2.51] in women). Cervical (1.49[1.11-2.00]), uterine (1.69[1.09-2.61]), breast (1.16[1.02-1.32]), thyroid (1.49[1.28-1.74]), and lung cancers (1.79[1.32-2.44]) in women; and skin cancer (5.33[1.55-18.30]) in men were also significantly related to HBV infection.

CONCLUSIONS
Chronic HBV infection is associated with several malignant disorders including lymphoma, and biliary, cervical, uterine, breast, thyroid, lung, and skin cancers. Our findings may offer additional insights into the development of these neoplasms and may suggest the need to consider HBV screening in cancer patients and cancer surveillance in HBV-infected subjects.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 × two =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]