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Cigarette smoke challenges bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell capacities in guinea pig.

Cigarette smoke challenges bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell capacities in guinea pig.
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Tura-Ceide O, Lobo B, Paul T, Puig-Pey R, Coll-Bonfill N, García-Lucio J, Smolders V, Blanco I, Barberà JA, Peinado VI,


Tura-Ceide O, Lobo B, Paul T, Puig-Pey R, Coll-Bonfill N, García-Lucio J, Smolders V, Blanco I, Barberà JA, Peinado VI, (click to view)

Tura-Ceide O, Lobo B, Paul T, Puig-Pey R, Coll-Bonfill N, García-Lucio J, Smolders V, Blanco I, Barberà JA, Peinado VI,

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Respiratory research 2017 03 2318(1) 50 doi 10.1186/s12931-017-0530-0
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Cigarette smoke (CS) is associated with lower numbers of circulating stem cells and might severely affect their mobilization, trafficking and homing. Our study was designed to demonstrate in an animal model of CS exposure whether CS affects the homing and functional capabilities of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs).

METHODS
Guinea pigs (GP), exposed or sham-exposed to CS, were administered via tracheal instillation or by vascular administration with 2.5 × 10(6) BM-MSCs obtained from CS-exposed or sham-exposed animal donors. Twenty-four hours after cell administration, animals were sacrificed and cells were visualised into lung structures by optical microscopy. BM-MSCs from 8 healthy GP and from 8 GP exposed to CS for 1 month were isolated from the femur, cultured in vitro and assessed for their proliferation, migration, senescence, differentiation potential and chemokine gene expression profile.

RESULTS
CS-exposed animals showed greater BM-MSCs lung infiltration than sham-exposed animals regardless of route of administration. The majority of BM-MSCs localized in the alveolar septa. BM-MSCs obtained from CS-exposed animals showed lower ability to engraft and lower proliferation and migration. In vitro, BM-MSCs exposed to CS extract showed a significant reduction of proliferative, cellular differentiation and migratory potential and an increase in cellular senescence in a dose dependent manner.

CONCLUSION
Short-term CS exposure induces BM-MSCs dysfunction. Such dysfunction was observed in vivo, affecting the cell homing and proliferation capabilities of BM-MSCs in lungs exposed to CS and in vitro altering the rate of proliferation, senescence, differentiation and migration capacity. Additionally, CS induced a reduction in CXCL9 gene expression in the BM from CS-exposed animals underpinning a potential mechanistic action of bone marrow dysfunction.

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