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Classification of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) according to the new Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2017: Comparison with GOLD 2011.

Classification of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) according to the new Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2017: Comparison with GOLD 2011.
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Marçôa R, Rodrigues DM, Dias M, Ladeira I, Vaz AP, Lima R, Guimarães M,


Marçôa R, Rodrigues DM, Dias M, Ladeira I, Vaz AP, Lima R, Guimarães M, (click to view)

Marçôa R, Rodrigues DM, Dias M, Ladeira I, Vaz AP, Lima R, Guimarães M,

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COPD 2017 11 21() 1-6 doi 10.1080/15412555.2017.1394285
Abstract

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) project has been working to improve awareness, prevention and management of this disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate how COPD patients are reclassified by the 2017 GOLD system (versus GOLD 2011), to calculate the level of agreement between these two classifications in allocation to categories and to compare the performance of each classification to predict future exacerbations. Two-hundred COPD patients (>40 years, post bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity<0.7) followed in pulmonology consultation were recruited into this prospective multicentric study. Approximately half of the patients classified as GOLD D [2011] changed to GOLD B [2017]. The extent of agreement between GOLD 2011 and GOLD 2017 was moderate (Cohen's Kappa = 0.511; p < 0.001) and the ability to predict exacerbations was similar (69.7% and 67.6%, respectively). GOLD B [2017] exacerbated 17% more than GOLD B [2011] and had a lower percent predicted post bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). GOLD B [2017] turned to be the predominant category, more heterogeneous and with a higher risk of exacerbation versus GOLD B [2011]. Physicians should be cautious in assessing the GOLD B [2017] patients. The assessment of patients should always be personalized. More studies are needed to evaluate the impact of the 2017 reclassification in predicting outcomes such as future exacerbations and mortality.

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