CME/CE: Addressing Sugar Intake to Achieve Weight Loss

CME/CE: Addressing Sugar Intake to Achieve Weight Loss
Author Information (click to view)

Michael Clearfield, DO

Dean
Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Michael Clearfield, DO, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that he has no financial interests to disclose.

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Michael Clearfield, DO (click to view)

Michael Clearfield, DO

Dean
Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Michael Clearfield, DO, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that he has no financial interests to disclose.

Researchers have detailed the dangers of fructose, particularly high-fructose corn syrup, in the diet. They note the benefits of even small, short-term changes to fructose intake.
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Readings & Resources (click to view)

Schwarz J, Clearfield M, Mulligan K. Conversion of sugar to fat: is hepatic de novo lipogenesis leading to metabolic syndrome and associated chronic diseases? J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2017;117:520-527. Available at http://jaoa.org/article.aspx?articleid=2646761.

Sanders T. How important is the relative balance of fat and carbohydrate as sources of energy in relation to health? Proc Nutr Soc. 2016;75:147-153.

Kearns C, Schmidt L, Glantz S. Sugar industry and coronary heart disease research: a historical analysis of internal industry documents. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176:1680-1685.

Schwarz J, Noworolski S, Wen M, et al. Effect of a high-fructose weight-maintaining diet on lipogenesis and liver fat. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015;100:2434-2442.

Lustig R, Mulligan K, Noworolski S, et al. Isocaloric fructose restriction and metabolic improvement in children with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Obesity. 2016; 24:453-460.

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