CME/CE – Advanced Cancer: Analyzing Patient Discussions

CME/CE – Advanced Cancer: Analyzing Patient Discussions
Author Information (click to view)

Holly G. Prigerson, PhD

Irving Sherwood Wright Professor of Geriatrics
Professor of Sociology in Medicine
Director, Center for Research on End-of-Life Care
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York-Presbyterian Hospital

Holly G. Prigerson, PhD, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that she has or has had no financial interests to report.

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Holly G. Prigerson, PhD (click to view)

Holly G. Prigerson, PhD

Irving Sherwood Wright Professor of Geriatrics
Professor of Sociology in Medicine
Director, Center for Research on End-of-Life Care
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York-Presbyterian Hospital

Holly G. Prigerson, PhD, has indicated to Physician’s Weekly that she has or has had no financial interests to report.

Patients with advanced cancer who have recent or ongoing discussions about their prognosis and life expectancy appear to have a better understanding of the nature of their illness, according to a study. Having these conversations may help patients make more informed end-of-life care decisions.
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Readings & Resources (click to view)

Epstein AS, Prigerson HG, O’Reilly EM, Maciejewski PK. Discussions of life expectancy and changes in illness understanding in patients with advanced cancer. J Clin Onc. 2016 May 23 [Epub ahead of print]. Available at: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2016/05/19/JCO.2015.63.6696.full.

Mack JW, Smith TJ. Reasons why physicians do not have discussions about poor prognosis, why it matters, and what can be improved. J Clin Oncol. 2012;30:2715-2717.

Daugherty CK, Hlubocky FJ. What are terminally ill cancer patients told about their expected deaths? A study of cancer physicians’ self-reports of prognosis disclosure. J Clin Oncol. 2008;26:5988-5993.

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