Advertisement

 

 

Correlates of Never Testing for HIV Among Sexually Active Internet-Recruited Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States.

Correlates of Never Testing for HIV Among Sexually Active Internet-Recruited Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States.
Author Information (click to view)

Nelson KM, Pantalone DW, Gamarel KE, Carey MP, Simoni JM,


Nelson KM, Pantalone DW, Gamarel KE, Carey MP, Simoni JM, (click to view)

Nelson KM, Pantalone DW, Gamarel KE, Carey MP, Simoni JM,

Advertisement
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

AIDS patient care and STDs 2017 12 12() doi 10.1089/apc.2017.0244

Abstract

In the United States, gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) are disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Despite great strides in HIV prevention, including biobehavioral HIV prevention strategies such as pre-exposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention, there has been relatively low uptake of these strategies. The success of biobehavioral prevention strategies requires HIV testing but a subset of GBMSM have never been tested. To optimize prevention efforts, we sought to understand the characteristics of GBMSM who report never testing for HIV. A sample of GBMSM was recruited online in 2012 to complete a cross-sectional survey of sexual behavior and sexual health. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify characteristics of "never testing for HIV." Of the 1170 participants, 151 (13%) reported never testing for HIV. In multivariable analyses, younger age, less education, endorsing a non-gay sexual identity, living in rural areas, not having a primary partner, living in unstable housing, and reporting regular condom use during anal sex were independently associated with never testing. We conclude that, despite a substantial focus on HIV testing among GBMSM in the United States, a proportion of sexually active, adult GBMSM report never having tested for HIV in their lifetimes. The current study illustrates the importance of addressing individual and structural factors that serve as barriers to HIV testing among GBMSM. Addressing these barriers will improve access to HIV testing and other biobehavioral HIV prevention strategies and, ultimately, alleviate disparities in HIV/AIDS in the United States.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

five × 2 =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]