This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between obesity and pelvic organ prolapse (POP), both anatomically and symptomatically, in Korean women.
We retrospectively reviewed 476 women who visited the urogynecology clinic between January 2013 and December 2016. All the enrolled women were Korean. We sought to evaluate the relationship between obesity and POP, both anatomically and symptomatically, by using a validated tool. Anatomic assessment was performed by a standardized Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) system and symptomatic assessment was performed by a Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI)-20 questionnaire. Obesity measurement was performed by measuring body mass index (BMI).
We enrolled 476 women in our study. There was no statistically significant correlation between BMI and POP-Q or PFDI-20 scores: Ba (P=0.633), Bp (P=0.363), C (P=0.277), Pelvic Organ Prolapse Distress Inventory-6 (P=0.286), Colorectal Anal Distress Inventory-8 (P=0.960), Urinary Distress Inventory-6 (P=0.355), and PFDI-20 (P=0.355). In addition, there was no statistically significant correlation between BMI and POP-Q or PFDI-20 in patients with severe (greater than stage III) POP. We also separately analyzed the differences in the POP-Q points and PFDI-20 scores between the obese and non-obese groups. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups.
We evaluated the correlation between obesity and POP using a validated tool. The present study revealed no significant correlation between obesity and POP severity anatomically or symptomatically in Korean women. This contrasts the results of most studies of Western women. Further studies in Asian women are required in order to confirm our results.

References

PubMed