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Corticospinal excitability to the biceps brachii and its relationship to postactivation potentiation of the elbow flexors.

Corticospinal excitability to the biceps brachii and its relationship to postactivation potentiation of the elbow flexors.
Author Information (click to view)

Collins BW, Gale LH, Buckle NCM, Button DC,


Collins BW, Gale LH, Buckle NCM, Button DC, (click to view)

Collins BW, Gale LH, Buckle NCM, Button DC,

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Physiological reports 2017 04 285(8) pii e13265
Abstract

We examined the effects of a submaximal voluntary elbow flexor contraction protocol on measures of corticospinal excitability and postactivation potentiation of evoked muscle forces and if these measures were state-dependent (rest vs. voluntary muscle contraction). Participants completed four experimental sessions where they rested or performed a 5% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the elbow flexors prior to, immediately, and 5 min following a submaximal contraction protocol. During rest or 5% MVC, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transmastoid electrical stimulation, electrical stimulation of biceps brachii motor point and Erb’s point were elicited to induce motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cervicomedullary MEPs (CMEPs), potentiated twitch (PT) force, and maximal muscle compound action potential (Mmax), respectively prior to, immediately, and 5 min postcontraction protocol. MEP amplitudes increased (215 and 165%Mmax, P ≤ 0.03) only at 1 and 6s postcontraction protocol, respectively during rest but not 5% MVC CMEP amplitudes decreased during rest and 5% MVC (range:21-58%Mmax, P ≤ 0.04) for up to 81 sec postcontraction protocol. Peak twitch force increased immediately postcontraction protocol and remained elevated for 90 sec (range:122-147% increase, P < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between MEP and PT force during rest (r = 0.88, P = 0.01) and a negative correlation between CMEP and PT force during rest (r = -0.85, P < 0.02 and 5% MVC (r = -0.96, P < 0.01) immediately postcontraction protocol. In conclusion, the change in corticospinal and spinal excitability was state- and time-dependent whereas spinal excitability and postactivation potentiation were time-dependent following the contraction protocol. Changes in corticospinal excitability and postactivation potentiation correlated and were also state-dependent.

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