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Decreased spontaneous activity and altered evoked nociceptive response of rat thalamic submedius neurons to lumbar vertebra thrust.

Decreased spontaneous activity and altered evoked nociceptive response of rat thalamic submedius neurons to lumbar vertebra thrust.
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Reed WR, Cranston JT, Onifer SM, Little JW, Sozio RS,


Reed WR, Cranston JT, Onifer SM, Little JW, Sozio RS, (click to view)

Reed WR, Cranston JT, Onifer SM, Little JW, Sozio RS,

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Experimental brain research 2017 07 07() doi 10.1007/s00221-017-5013-5
Abstract

The thalamus is a central structure important to modulating and processing all mechanoreceptor input destined for the cortex. A large number of diverse mechanoreceptor endings are stimulated when a high velocity low amplitude thrust is delivered to the lumbar spine during spinal manipulation. The objective of this study was to determine if a lumbar thrust alters spontaneous and/or evoked nociceptive activity in medial thalamic submedius (Sm) neurons. Extracellular recordings were obtained from 94 thalamic Sm neurons in 54 urethane-anesthetized adult Wistar rats. Spontaneous activity was recorded 5 min before and after an L5 control (no thrust) and thrust (85% rat body weight; 100 ms) procedure. In a subset of responsive nociceptive-specific neurons, mean changes in noxious-evoked response (10-s pinch with clip; 795 g) at three sites (tail, contra- and ipsilateral hindpaw) were determined following an L5 thrust. Mean changes in Sm spontaneous activity (60 s bins) and evoked noxious response were compared using a mixed model repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni post hoc t tests and paired t tests, respectively. Compared to control, spontaneous Sm activity decreased 180-240 s following the lumbar thrust (p < 0.005). Inhibitory evoked responses were attenuated in the contralateral hindpaw following an L5 thrust compared to control (p < 0.05). No other changes in spontaneous or noxious-evoked Sm activity were found. A delayed, but prolonged suppression of spontaneous Sm activity along with changes in noxious-evoked inhibitory responses in the contralateral hindpaw following lumbar vertebra thrust suggest that thalamic submedius neurons may play a role in central pain modulation related to manual therapy intervention.

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