To explore the determinants of and behaviour change models for seasonal influenza vaccination compliance among healthcare personnel.
COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among healthcare personnel may be better understood by exploring determinants of seasonal influenza vaccine hesitancy.
Integrative literature review.
A systematic search was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Six thousand and forty-eight articles were screened. Seventy-eight met inclusion criteria. Due to the heterogeneity of included articles, a narrative synthesis was conducted utilising a conceptual matrix to identify thematic categories.
Six thematic categories were identified as influencing HCP SIV compliance: ‘perceived vulnerability’, ‘trust’, ‘past behaviour’, ‘professional duty’, ‘access and convenience’ and ‘knowledge and experience’. The Health Belief Model (HBM) was the most commonly utilised health behaviour change model within the seasonal influenza vaccination context. Few studies have examined seasonal influenza vaccine acceptance and uptake within the Australian HCP context, particularly involving community care and aged care.
Factors that appear to relate to influenza vaccination compliance among HCP can be grouped according to several thematic categories, and they also appear influential in COVID-19 vaccine uptake. In particular, an emerging focus on ‘trust’ or the more emotive considerations of decision-making around health-protective behaviours requires further exploration in the context of a pandemic. Efforts to influence these domains to increase compliance, however, are likely to be impeded by a lack of a well-developed and tested behaviour change model.
Healthcare personnel (HCP) face high levels of occupational exposure to seasonal influenza every year. An emerging focus on ‘trust’ and the more emotive considerations of decision-making around health-protective behaviours requires further exploration in the context of a pandemic.

© 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.