Advertisement

 

 

Diabetes-related burden and distress in people with diabetes mellitus at primary care level in Germany.

Diabetes-related burden and distress in people with diabetes mellitus at primary care level in Germany.
Author Information (click to view)

Kuniss N, Rechtacek T, Kloos C, Müller UA, Roth J, Burghardt K, Kramer G,


Kuniss N, Rechtacek T, Kloos C, Müller UA, Roth J, Burghardt K, Kramer G, (click to view)

Kuniss N, Rechtacek T, Kloos C, Müller UA, Roth J, Burghardt K, Kramer G,

Advertisement

Acta diabetologica 2017 02 16() doi 10.1007/s00592-017-0972-3
Abstract
AIMS
The importance of diabetes-related distress for the treatment of diabetes is emphasised in national and international guidelines recommending routinely screening for psychosocial problems. Data of investigations regarding diabetes-related distress on primary care are rare in Germany though most people with diabetes are treated without insulin therapy at primary care level.

METHODS
Three hundred and forty-five people with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2, n = 336, 229 without and 107 with insulin therapy) and type 1 (DM1, n = 9) were interviewed with the PAID questionnaire in the period from 1 October 2015 to 31 December 2015 in a general practice. A PAID score ≥40 (range 0-100) was considered as high diabetes-related distress.

RESULTS
The mean PAID score of all participants was 3.9 ± 7.0 (DM2 without insulin 2.7 ± 6.3, DM2 with insulin therapy 6.0 ± 8.0, DM1 6.8 ± 4.9) and far below the threshold of 40 points. Only 1.2% of all responders showed high diabetes-related distress (score ≥40). People on insulin therapy with HbA1c >7.5% and with diagnosed depression prior to the study scored significantly higher. Furthermore, there are weak correlations between the PAID score and HbA1c (r = 0.253, p < 0.001), duration of diabetes (r = 0.169, p = 0.002), insulin dosage (r = 0.283, p < 0.001) and age (r = -0.129, p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS
Only 1.2% of our outpatients with diabetes on primary care level showed high diabetes-related distress. Higher rates in the current literature are probably due to not investigating on primary care level. Guidelines should consider this.

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

eleven − five =

[ HIDE/SHOW ]