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Dietary reversal of neuropathy in a murine model of prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

Dietary reversal of neuropathy in a murine model of prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome.
Author Information (click to view)

Hinder LM, O'Brien PD, Hayes JM, Backus C, Solway AP, Sims-Robinson C, Feldman EL,


Hinder LM, O'Brien PD, Hayes JM, Backus C, Solway AP, Sims-Robinson C, Feldman EL, (click to view)

Hinder LM, O'Brien PD, Hayes JM, Backus C, Solway AP, Sims-Robinson C, Feldman EL,

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Disease models & mechanisms 2017 04 05() pii dmm.028530
Abstract

Patients with the metabolic syndrome, defined as obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), can develop the same macro- and microvascular complications as patients with type 2 diabetes, including peripheral neuropathy. In type 2 diabetes, glycemic control has little effect on the development and progression of peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that other metabolic syndrome components may contribute to the presence of neuropathy. A parallel phenomenon is observed in patients with prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome, where improvement in weight and dyslipidemia more closely correlates with restoration of nerve function than improvement in glycemic status. The goal of the current study was to develop a murine model that resembles the human condition. We examined longitudinal parameters of the metabolic syndrome and neuropathy development in six mouse strains/genotypes (BKS-wt, BKS-Lepr(db/+), B6-wt, B6-Lepr(db/+), BTBR-wt, and BTBR-Lep(ob/+)) fed a 54% high-fat diet (HFD; from lard). All HFD-fed mice developed large fiber neuropathy and IGT. Changes appeared early and consistently in B6-wt mice, and paralleled the onset of neuropathy. Terminally, B6-wt mice displayed all components of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, IGT, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and oxidized low density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Dietary reversal, whereby B6-wt mice fed HFD from 4-20 weeks of age were switched to standard chow for 4 weeks, completely normalized neuropathy, promoted weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity, and restored LDL-cholesterol and oxLDL by 50% compared to HFD control mice. This dietary reversal model provides the basis for mechanistic studies investigating peripheral nerve damage in the setting of the metabolic syndrome, and ultimately the development of mechanism-based therapies for neuropathy.

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