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Drooling Reduction Intervention randomised trial (DRI): comparing the efficacy and acceptability of hyoscine patches and glycopyrronium liquid on drooling in children with neurodisability.

Drooling Reduction Intervention randomised trial (DRI): comparing the efficacy and acceptability of hyoscine patches and glycopyrronium liquid on drooling in children with neurodisability.
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Parr JR, Todhunter E, Pennington L, Stocken D, Cadwgan J, O'Hare AE, Tuffrey C, Williams J, Cole M, Colver AF,


Parr JR, Todhunter E, Pennington L, Stocken D, Cadwgan J, O'Hare AE, Tuffrey C, Williams J, Cole M, Colver AF, (click to view)

Parr JR, Todhunter E, Pennington L, Stocken D, Cadwgan J, O'Hare AE, Tuffrey C, Williams J, Cole M, Colver AF,

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Archives of disease in childhood 2017 11 30() pii archdischild-2017-313763
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
Investigate whether hyoscine patch or glycopyrronium liquid is more effective and acceptable to treat drooling in children with neurodisability.

DESIGN
Multicentre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial.

SETTING
Recruitment through neurodisability teams; treatment by parents.

PARTICIPANTS
Ninety children with neurodisability who had never received medication for drooling (55 boys, 35 girls; median age 4 years).

EXCLUSION CRITERIA
medication contraindicated; in a trial that could affect drooling or management.

INTERVENTION
Children were randomised to receive a hyoscine skin patch or glycopyrronium liquid. Dose was increased over 4 weeks to achieve optimum symptom control with minimal side-effects; steady dose then continued to 12 weeks.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES
Primary outcome: Drooling Impact Scale (DIS) score at week-4.

SECONDARY OUTCOMES
change in DIS scores over 12 weeks, Drooling Severity and Frequency Scale and Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication; adverse events; children’s perception about treatment.

RESULTS
Both medications yielded clinically and statistically significant reductions in mean DIS at week-4 (25.0 (SD 22.2) for hyoscine and 26.6 (SD 16) for glycopyrronium). There was no significant difference in change in DIS scores between treatment groups. By week-12, 26/47 (55%) children starting treatment were receiving hyoscine compared with 31/38 (82%) on glycopyrronium. There was a 42% increased chance of being on treatment at week-12 for children randomised to glycopyrronium relative to hyoscine (1.42, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.95).

CONCLUSIONS
Hyoscine and glycopyrronium are clinically effective in treating drooling in children with neurodisability. Hyoscine produced more problematic side effects leading to a greater chance of treatment cessation.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBERS
ISRCTN 75287237; EUDRACT: 2013-000863-94; Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency: 17136/0264/001-0003.

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