Data from the ULTIMATE I & II Phase 3 trials evaluating ublituximab in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS) will be highlighted at the upcoming 37th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS), being held virtually October 13 – 15, 2021. Regular abstracts are now available through the ECTRIMS platform and late-breaking abstracts will be accessible on October 13, 2021. Additional presentation details, including a direct link to the currently available abstract is included below.

Two abstracts were accepted for presentation, including an oral presentation, showcasing data from the ULTIMATE I & II Phase 3 trials.

Oral Presentation Title: Phase 3 results of the ULTIMATE I & II global studies: ublituximab versus teriflunomide in relapsing multiple sclerosis

  • Presentation Date/Time: Thursday, October 14, 2021, at 11:11 – 11:18 AM ET
  • Session: Free Communications 2 – Treatment trials – Immunomodulation
  • Lead Author: Lawrence Steinman, MD, Zimmermann Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, and Pediatrics at Stanford University
Late Breaking ePoster Title: Ublituximab is associated with significant improvement in the multiple sclerosis functional composite (MSFC): results from the Phase 3 ULTIMATE I & II studies
For latest news and updates
  • Presentation Date/Time: Available for on demand download beginning on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 at 6:00 AM ET
  • Lead Author: Lawrence Steinman, MD, Zimmermann Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, and Pediatrics at Stanford University
  • NOTE: This abstract was accepted as a late breaking presentation and the full text abstract will not be available until October 13, 2021

ABOUT THE ULTIMATE I & II PHASE 3 TRIALS
ULTIMATE I and ULTIMATE II are two independent Phase 3, randomized, double-blinded, active-controlled, global, multi-center studies evaluating the efficacy and safety/tolerability of ublituximab (450mg dose administered by one-hour intravenous infusion every 6 months, following a Day 1 infusion of 150mg over four hours and a Day 15 infusion of 450mg over one hour) versus teriflunomide (14mg oral tablets taken once daily) in subjects with relapsing forms of Multiple Sclerosis (RMS). The ULTIMATE I & II trials enrolled a total of 1,094 patients with RMS across 10 countries. These trials were led by Lawrence Steinman, MD, Zimmermann Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences, and Pediatrics at Stanford University and were conducted under a Special Protocol Assessment (SPA) agreement with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). As previously announced, both studies met their primary endpoint with ublituximab treatment demonstrating a statistically significant reduction in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared to terifunomide over a 96-week period (p<0.005 in each trial). Additional information on these clinical trials can be found at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT03277261; NCT03277248).

ABOUT UBLITUXIMAB
Ublituximab is an investigational glycoengineered monoclonal antibody that targets a unique epitope on CD20-expressing B-cells. When ublituximab binds to the B-cell it triggers a series of immunological reactions, including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), leading to destruction of the cell. Additionally, ublituximab is uniquely designed, to lack certain sugar molecules normally expressed on the antibody. Removal of these sugar molecules, a process called glycoengineering, has been shown to enhance the potency of ublituximab, especially the ADCC activity. Targeting CD20 using monoclonal antibodies has proven to be an important therapeutic approach for the management of B-cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders, both diseases driven by the abnormal growth or function of B-cells.

ABOUT MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
Relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and includes people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and people with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) who continue to experience relapses. RRMS is the most common form of multiple sclerosis (MS) and is characterized by episodes of new or worsening signs or symptoms (relapses) followed by periods of recovery. It is estimated that nearly 1 million people are living with MS in the United States and approximately 85% are initially diagnosed with RRMS.1,2 The majority of people who are diagnosed with RRMS will eventually transition to SPMS, in which they experience steadily worsening disability over time. Worldwide, more than 2.3 million people have a diagnosis of MS.1