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Effects of natural peptides from food proteins on angiotensin converting enzyme activity and hypertension.

Effects of natural peptides from food proteins on angiotensin converting enzyme activity and hypertension.
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Martin M, Deussen A,


Martin M, Deussen A, (click to view)

Martin M, Deussen A,

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Critical reviews in food science and nutrition 2017 12 15() 1-20 doi 10.1080/10408398.2017.1402750
Abstract

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death. The underlying pathophysiology is largely contributed by an overactivation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS). Herein, angiotensin II (AngII) is a key mediator not only in blood pressure control and vascular tone regulation, but also involved in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, hypertension and congestive heart failure. Since more than three decades suppression of AngII generation by inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) or blockade of the AngII-receptor has shown clinical benefit by reducing hypertension, atherosclerosis and other inflammation-associated cardiovascular diseases. Besides pharmaceutical ACE-inhibitors some natural peptides derived from food proteins reduce in vitro ACE activity. Several animal studies and a few human clinical trials have shown antihypertensive effects of such peptides, which might be attractive as food additives to prevent age-related RAAS activation. However, their inhibitory potency on in vitro ACE activity does not always correlate with an antihypertensive impact. While some peptides with high inhibitory activity on ACE-activity in vitro show no antihypertensive effect in vivo, other peptides with only a moderate ACE inhibitory activity in vitro cause such effects. The explanation for this conflicting phenomenon between inhibitory activity and antihypertensive effect remains unclear to date. This review shall critically address the effects of natural peptides derived from different food proteins on the cardiovascular system and the possible underlying mechanisms. A central aspect will be to point to conceptual gaps in the current understanding of the action of these peptides with respect to in vivo blood pressure lowering effects.

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