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Engaging clinicians and patients to assess and improve frailty measurement in adults with end stage renal disease.

Engaging clinicians and patients to assess and improve frailty measurement in adults with end stage renal disease.
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Van Pilsum Rasmussen S, Konel J, Warsame F, Ying H, Buta B, Haugen C, King E, DiBrito S, Varadhan R, Rodríguez-Mañas L, Walston JD, Segev DL, McAdams-DeMarco MA,


Van Pilsum Rasmussen S, Konel J, Warsame F, Ying H, Buta B, Haugen C, King E, DiBrito S, Varadhan R, Rodríguez-Mañas L, Walston JD, Segev DL, McAdams-DeMarco MA, (click to view)

Van Pilsum Rasmussen S, Konel J, Warsame F, Ying H, Buta B, Haugen C, King E, DiBrito S, Varadhan R, Rodríguez-Mañas L, Walston JD, Segev DL, McAdams-DeMarco MA,

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BMC nephrology 2018 01 1219(1) 8 doi 10.1186/s12882-017-0806-0
Abstract
BACKGROUND
The Fried frailty phenotype, a measure of physiologic reserve defined by 5 components (exhaustion, unintentional weight loss, low physical activity, slow walking speed, and poor grip strength), is associated with poor outcomes among ESRD patients. However, these 5 components may not fully capture physiologic reserve in this population. We aimed to ascertain opinions of ESRD clinicians and patients about the usefulness of the Fried frailty phenotype and interventions to improve frailty in ESRD patients, and to identify novel components to further characterize frailty in ESRD.

METHODS
Clinicians who treat adults with ESRD completed a 2-round Delphi study (n = 41 and n = 36, respectively; response rate = 87%). ESRD patients completed a survey at transplant evaluation (n = 460; response rate = 81%). We compared clinician and patient opinions on the constituent components of frailty.

RESULTS
Clinicians were more likely than patients to say that ESRD makes patients frail (97.6% vs. 60.2%). There was consensus among clinicians that exhaustion, low physical activity, slow walking speed, and poor grip strength characterize frailty in ESRD patients; however, 29% of clinicians thought weight loss was not relevant. Patients were less likely than clinicians to say that the 5 Fried frailty components were relevant. Clinicians identified 10 new ESRD-specific potential components including falls (64%), physical decline (61%), and cognitive impairment (39%). Clinicians (83%) and patients (80%) agreed that intradialytic foot-peddlers might make ESRD patients less frail.

CONCLUSIONS
There was consensus among clinicians and moderate consensus among patients that frailty is more common in ESRD. Weight loss was not seen as relevant, but new components were identified. These findings are first steps in refining the frailty phenotype and identifying interventions to improve physiologic reserve specific to ESRD patients.

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