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Evidence of previous but not current transmission of chikungunya virus in southern and central Vietnam: Results from a systematic review and a seroprevalence study in four locations.

Evidence of previous but not current transmission of chikungunya virus in southern and central Vietnam: Results from a systematic review and a seroprevalence study in four locations.
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Quan TM, Phuong HT, Vy NHT, Thanh NTL, Lien NTN, Hong TTK, Dung PN, Chau NVV, Boni MF, Clapham HE,


Quan TM, Phuong HT, Vy NHT, Thanh NTL, Lien NTN, Hong TTK, Dung PN, Chau NVV, Boni MF, Clapham HE, (click to view)

Quan TM, Phuong HT, Vy NHT, Thanh NTL, Lien NTN, Hong TTK, Dung PN, Chau NVV, Boni MF, Clapham HE,

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PLoS neglected tropical diseases 2018 02 0912(2) e0006246 doi 10.1371/journal.pntd.0006246
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Arbovirus infections are a serious concern in tropical countries due to their high levels of transmission and morbidity. With the outbreaks of chikungunya (CHIKV) in surrounding regions in recent years and the fact that the environment in Vietnam is suitable for the vectors of CHIKV, the possibility of transmission of CHIKV in Vietnam is of great interest. However, information about CHIKV activity in Vietnam remains limited.

METHODOLOGY
In order to address this question, we performed a systematic review of CHIKV in Vietnam and a CHIKV seroprevalence survey. The seroprevalence survey tested for CHIKV IgG in population serum samples from individuals of all ages in 2015 from four locations in Vietnam.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS
The four locations were An Giang province (n = 137), Ho Chi Minh City (n = 136), Dak Lak province (n = 137), and Hue City (n = 136). The findings give us evidence of some CHIKV activity: 73/546 of overall samples were seropositive (13.4%). The age-adjusted seroprevalences were 12.30% (6.58-18.02), 13.42% (7.16-19.68), 7.97% (3.56-12.38), and 3.72% (1.75-5.69) in An Giang province, Ho Chi Minh City, Dak Lak province, and Hue City respectively. However, the age-stratified seroprevalence suggests that the last transmission ended around 30 years ago, consistent with results from the systematic review. We see no evidence for on-going transmission in three of the locations, though with some evidence of recent exposure in Dak Lak, most likely due to transmission in neighbouring countries. Before the 1980s, when transmission was occurring, we estimate on average 2-4% of the population were infected each year in HCMC and An Giang and Hue (though transmision ended earlier in Hue). We estimate lower transmission in Dak Lak, with around 1% of the population infected each year.

CONCLUSION
In conclusion, we find evidence of past CHIKV transmission in central and southern Vietnam, but no evidence of recent sustained transmission. When transmission of CHIKV did occur, it appeared to be widespread and affect a geographically diverse population. The estimated susceptibility of the population to chikungunya is continually increasing, therefore the possibility of future CHIKV transmission in Vietnam remains.

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