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Examining the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence Type and Timing on Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Awareness, Interest, and Coercion.

Examining the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence Type and Timing on Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Awareness, Interest, and Coercion.
Author Information (click to view)

Willie TC, Stockman JK, Overstreet NM, Kershaw TS,


Willie TC, Stockman JK, Overstreet NM, Kershaw TS, (click to view)

Willie TC, Stockman JK, Overstreet NM, Kershaw TS,

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AIDS and behavior 2017 09 08() doi 10.1007/s10461-017-1901-8

Abstract

Previous research suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with acceptability of and adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). However, very few studies have examined whether the type (i.e., physical, sexual, and psychological IPV) and timing (i.e., lifetime, past-year) of IPV experiences differentially relate to PrEP awareness, interest, and perceived PrEP coercion. Therefore, the objective of this study is to examine associations between lifetime and past-year physical, sexual, and psychological IPV experiences on PrEP awareness, interest, and perceived PrEP coercion. Data were collected from an online survey administered to 210 women and men. Past-year physical IPV experiences (AOR 4.53, 95% CI 1.85, 11.11) were significantly associated with being interested in using PrEP. Lifetime sexual (AOR 3.69, 95% CI 1.62, 8.40), psychological IPV (AOR 4.70, 95% CI 1.01, 21.89), and past-year sexual IPV experiences (AOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.10, 8.27) were also significantly associated with believing a recent partner would attempt to control the participant’s use of PrEP, if she or he were currently using it. Understanding that engaging in PrEP care is influenced differently by the type and timing of IPV has potential implications for PrEP candidacy guidelines and interventions.

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