The present study aimed to verify the effects of resistance training (RT) and successive detraining on body composition, muscle strength and lipid profile as primary outcome, and the oxidative stress and inflammatory markers as second outcome of postmenopausal BC survivors undergoing tamoxifen (TA).
Fourteen postmenopausal BC survivors underwent 12 weeks of resistance exercise training and subsequently 12 weeks of detraining. Anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, muscle strength, inflammatory cytokines and the oxidative stress markers, were assessed before, after the training period and after detraining period.
One-way ANOVA showed that fat mass decrease (39.4 ± 6.9 to 37.7 ± 6.8%) and free-fat mass increase (39.3 ± 4.9 to 40.3 ± 5.6%) after resistance exercise training. Muscle strength increased in response to training but decreased after the detraining period. Triglycerides (156 ± 45 to 123 ± 43 mg/dL) and total cholesterol (202 ± 13 to 186 ± 16 mg/dL) decreased after the resistance exercise training and HDL-cholesterol (47 ± 9 to 56 ± 9 mg/dL) increased after resistance exercise training and remained higher (53 ± 10 mg/dL) than after detraining. IL-6 increases (24.65 ± 10.85 to 41.42 ± 22.88 pg/mL) and IL-17 (2.42 ± 0.32 to 1.69 ± 0.19 pg/mL), TBARS (1.91 ± 0.19 to 1.03 ± 0.1 μmol/L), SOD (24.65 ± 10.85 to 41.42 ± 22.88 U/gHb) and Catalase activity (445.9 ± 113.0 to 345.8 ± 81.7 k/gHb·s) reduced after RT and remained lower after detraining.
Resistance exercise training improves health markers of BC survivors undergoing TA and detraining are not sufficient to reverse the positive effects in oxidative stress markers.

Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.