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Exploring physical activity behaviour – needs for and interest in a technology-delivered, home-based exercise programme among patients with intermittent claudication.

Exploring physical activity behaviour – needs for and interest in a technology-delivered, home-based exercise programme among patients with intermittent claudication.
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Cornelis N, Buys R, Fourneau I, Dewit T, Cornelissen V,


Cornelis N, Buys R, Fourneau I, Dewit T, Cornelissen V, (click to view)

Cornelis N, Buys R, Fourneau I, Dewit T, Cornelissen V,

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VASA. Zeitschrift fur Gefasskrankheiten 2017 11 16() 1-9 doi 10.1024/0301-1526/a000654
Abstract
BACKGROUND
Supervised walking is a first line therapy in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with complaints of intermittent claudication. However, uptake of supervised programmes is low. Home-based exercise seems an appealing alternative; especially since technological advances, such as tele-coaching and tele-monitoring, may facilitate the process and support patients when adopting a physically active lifestyle. To guide the development of such an intervention, it is important to identify barriers of physical activity and the needs and interests for technology-enabled exercise in this patient group.

PATIENTS AND METHODS
PAD patients were recruited at the vascular centre of UZ Leuven (Belgium). A questionnaire assessing PA (SF-International Physical Activity Questionnaire), barriers to PA, and interest in technology-supported exercise (Technology Usage Questionnaire) was completed. Descriptive and correlation analyses were performed.

RESULTS
Ninety-nine patients (76 men; mean age 69 years) completed the survey. Physical activity levels were low in 48 %, moderate in 29 %, and high in 23 %. Intermittent claudication itself is the most important barrier for enhanced PA, with most patients reporting pain (93 %), need for rest (92 %), and obstacles worsening their pain (74 %) as barriers. A total of 93 % participants owned a mobile phone; 76 % had Internet access. Eighty-seven reported the need for an exercise programme, with 67 % showing interest in tele-coaching to support exercise. If technology was available, three-quarter stated they would be interested in home-based tele-coaching using the Internet (preferably e-mails, 86 %); 50 % via mobile phone, 87 % preferred text messages. Both were inversely related to age (rpb = 0.363 and rpb = 0.255, p < 0.05). Acquaintance with elastic bands or gaming platforms was moderate (55 and 49 %, respectively), but patients were interested in using them as alternatives (84 and 42 %). Interest in platforms was age-dependent (rs = -0.508, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS
PAD patients show significant interest in technology-delivered exercise, offering opportunities to develop a guided home-based exercise programme.

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