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Exploring the link between innate immune activation and thymic function by measuring sCD14 and TRECs in HIV patients living in Belgium.

Exploring the link between innate immune activation and thymic function by measuring sCD14 and TRECs in HIV patients living in Belgium.
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De Voeght A, Martens H, Renard C, Vaira D, Debruche M, Simonet J, Geenen V, Moutschen M, Darcis G,


De Voeght A, Martens H, Renard C, Vaira D, Debruche M, Simonet J, Geenen V, Moutschen M, Darcis G, (click to view)

De Voeght A, Martens H, Renard C, Vaira D, Debruche M, Simonet J, Geenen V, Moutschen M, Darcis G,

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PloS one 2017 10 1912(10) e0185761 doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0185761

Abstract

Microbial translocation is now viewed as a central event in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation during HIV infection. Thymic function failure is another crucial factor involved in HIV disease progression. The goal of this study was to explore the hypothesis of potential links between microbial translocation and thymic function in HIV-1 patients living in Belgium. The extent of microbial translocation was assessed through the measurement of soluble CD14 (sCD14). T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTRECs and dβTRECs) were used as a measure of thymic function. Data were collected from 75 HIV-infected patients. Simple and complex linear regressions were done to analyze the link between these two processes. We found a statistically relevant negative correlation between thymopoiesis (sjTREC) and sCD14 level (p = 0.004). These results suggest a link between thymic function failure, microbial translocation and innate immune activation.

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