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Floral contrivances and specialized pollination mechanism confer strong influence to elicit mixed-mating in Wrightia tomentosa (Apocynaceae).

Floral contrivances and specialized pollination mechanism confer strong influence to elicit mixed-mating in Wrightia tomentosa (Apocynaceae).
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Barman C, Singh VK, Das S, Tandon R,


Barman C, Singh VK, Das S, Tandon R, (click to view)

Barman C, Singh VK, Das S, Tandon R,

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Plant biology (Stuttgart, Germany) 2018 01 13() doi 10.1111/plb.12690
Abstract

• Reproductive success of a plant species is largely influenced by the outcomes of mating pattern in a population. It is believed that a significantly greater proportion of animal-pollinated plants have evolved a mixed-mating strategy, the extent of which may vary among species. It is thus pertinent to investigate the key contributors of mating success, especially to identify the reproductive constraints in depauperated populations of threatened plant species. • We looked into the contribution of floral architecture, pollination mechanism and breeding system on the extent of outcrossing rate in a near threatened tree species, W. tomentosa. The breeding system was ascertained from controlled pollination experiments. In order to determine the outcrossing rate, 60 open-pollinated progenies were analysed by employing AFLP marker. • Although the trees are self-compatible, herkogamy and compartmentalization of pollen and nectar in different chambers of the floral tube effectively dissuades spontaneous autogamy. Pollination is achieved through specialized interaction with moths. Differential foraging behaviour of settling moths and hawkmoths brings different proportion of geitono- and xenogamous pollen on the stigma. However, most of the open-pollinated progeny were the result of xenogamy (outcrossing rate, tm = 0.68). • The study shows that floral contrivances and the pollination system can confer a strong influence on the mating pattern. The differential foraging behaviour of the pollinators causes deposition of a mixture of self- and cross-pollen to produce a mixed-brood. Inbreeding depression and geitonogamy appear to play a significant role in sustaining mixed-mating in the species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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