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Food Sources of Sodium Intake in an Adult Mexican Population: A Sub-Analysis of the SALMEX Study.

Food Sources of Sodium Intake in an Adult Mexican Population: A Sub-Analysis of the SALMEX Study.
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Colin-Ramirez E, Espinosa-Cuevas Á, Miranda-Alatriste PV, Tovar-Villegas VI, Arcand J, Correa-Rotter R,


Colin-Ramirez E, Espinosa-Cuevas Á, Miranda-Alatriste PV, Tovar-Villegas VI, Arcand J, Correa-Rotter R, (click to view)

Colin-Ramirez E, Espinosa-Cuevas Á, Miranda-Alatriste PV, Tovar-Villegas VI, Arcand J, Correa-Rotter R,

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Nutrients 2017 07 279(8) pii E810
Abstract

Excessive dietary sodium intake increases blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. In Western diets, the majority of dietary sodium comes from packaged and prepared foods (≈75%); however, in Mexico there is no available data on the main food sources of dietary sodium. The main objective of this study was to identify and characterize the major food sources of dietary sodium in a sample of the Mexican Salt and Mexico (SALMEX) cohort. Adult male and female participants of the SALMEX study who provided a complete and valid three-day food record during the baseline visit were included. Overall, 950 participants (mean age 38.6 ± 10.7 years) were analyzed to determine the total sodium contributed by the main food sources of sodium identified. Mean daily sodium intake estimated by three-day food records and 24-h urinary sodium excretion was 2647.2 ± 976.9 mg/day and 3497.2 ± 1393.0, in the overall population, respectively. Processed meat was the main contributor to daily sodium intake, representing 8% of total sodium intake per capita as measured by three-day food records. When savory bread (8%) and sweet bakery goods (8%) were considered together as bread products, these were the major contributor to daily sodium intake, accounting for the 16% of total sodium intake, followed by processed meat (8%), natural cheeses (5%), and tacos (5%). These results highlight the need for public health policies focused on reducing the sodium content of processed food in Mexico.

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