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Frequent genes in rare diseases: panel-based next generation sequencing to disclose causal mutations in hereditary neuropathies.

Frequent genes in rare diseases: panel-based next generation sequencing to disclose causal mutations in hereditary neuropathies.
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Dohrn MF, Glöckle N, Mulahasanovic L, Heller C, Mohr J, Bauer C, Riesch E, Becker A, Battke F, Hörtnagel K, Hornemann T, Suriyanarayanan S, Blankenburg M, Schulz JB, Claeys KG, Gess B, Katona I, Ferbert A, Vittore D, Grimm A, Wolking S, Schöls L, Lerche H, Korenke GC, Fischer D, Schrank B, Kotzaeridou U, Kurlemann G, Dräger B, Schirmacher A, Young P, Schlotter-Weigel B, Biskup S,


Dohrn MF, Glöckle N, Mulahasanovic L, Heller C, Mohr J, Bauer C, Riesch E, Becker A, Battke F, Hörtnagel K, Hornemann T, Suriyanarayanan S, Blankenburg M, Schulz JB, Claeys KG, Gess B, Katona I, Ferbert A, Vittore D, Grimm A, Wolking S, Schöls L, Lerche H, Korenke GC, Fischer D, Schrank B, Kotzaeridou U, Kurlemann G, Dräger B, Schirmacher A, Young P, Schlotter-Weigel B, Biskup S, (click to view)

Dohrn MF, Glöckle N, Mulahasanovic L, Heller C, Mohr J, Bauer C, Riesch E, Becker A, Battke F, Hörtnagel K, Hornemann T, Suriyanarayanan S, Blankenburg M, Schulz JB, Claeys KG, Gess B, Katona I, Ferbert A, Vittore D, Grimm A, Wolking S, Schöls L, Lerche H, Korenke GC, Fischer D, Schrank B, Kotzaeridou U, Kurlemann G, Dräger B, Schirmacher A, Young P, Schlotter-Weigel B, Biskup S,

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Journal of neurochemistry 2017 09 13() doi 10.1111/jnc.14217
Abstract

Hereditary neuropathies comprise a wide variety of chronic diseases associated to more than 80 genes identified to date. We herein examined 612 index patients with either a Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype, hereditary sensory neuropathy, familial amyloid neuropathy, or small fiber neuropathy using a customized multigene panel based on the next generation sequencing (NGS) technique. In 121 cases (19.8%), we identified at least one putative pathogenic mutation. Out of these, 54.4% showed an autosomal dominant, 33.9% an autosomal recessive, and 11.6% an X-linked inheritance. The most frequently affected genes were PMP22 (16.4%), GJB1 (10.7%), MPZ and SH3TC2 (both 9.9%), and MFN2 (8.3%). We further detected likely or known pathogenic variants in HINT1, HSPB1, NEFL, PRX, IGHMBP2, NDRG1, TTR, EGR2, FIG4, GDAP1, LMNA, LRSAM1, POLG, TRPV4, AARS, BIC2, DHTKD1, FGD4, HK1, INF2, KIF5A, PDK3, REEP1, SBF1, SBF2, SCN9A, and SPTLC2 with a declining frequency. Thirty-four novel variants were considered likely pathogenic not having previously been described in association with any disorder in the literature. In one patient, two homozygous mutations in HK1 were detected in the multigene panel, but not by whole-exome-sequencing. A novel missense mutation in KIF5A was considered pathogenic due to the highly compatible phenotype. In one patient, the plasma sphingolipid profile could functionally prove the pathogenicity of a mutation in SPTLC2. One pathogenic mutation in MPZ was identified after being previously missed by Sanger sequencing. We conclude that panel based NGS is a useful, time- and cost-effective approach to assist clinicians in identifying the correct diagnosis and enable causative treatment considerations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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