The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) presents an unprecedented challenge to prevention and treatment. We aim to describe the clinical characteristics and risk factors of COVID-19 patients needing use assisted ventilation therapy.
In this retrospective cohort study, we included 288 adult inpatients diagnosed with COVID-19 in Guangzhou Eighth People’s Hospital. We extracted and compared characteristics between patients using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or not. A binary logistic regression model was used to identify risk factors associated with using CPAP therapy.
COVID-19 patients with CPAP therapy were older and had higher levels of white blood cells (WBC), procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), D-dimer, but had lymphopenia. They were also more prone to appear bilateral pneumonia, develop into severe or critically severe cases, and receive ICU admission. Multivariate regression analysis showed that each 1-year increase in age (OR, 1.04; 95%CI, 1.01-1.08; P = 0.013), respiratory rate over 24 times per min (OR, 4.78; 95%CI, 1.08-13.17; P = 0.037), diarrhea (OR, 9.62; 95%CI, 1.57-18.31; P = 0.011), ALT greater than 50 U/L (OR, 6.59; 95%CI, 1.35-15.89; P = 0.003), WBC greater than 10×10⁹/L (OR, 5.42; 95%CI, 2.04-14.75; P = 0.008), PCT greater than 0.05 ng/mL (OR, 7.22; 95%CI, 1.64-18.51; P = 0.018), and CRP greater than 10 mg/L (OR, 8.58; 95%CI, 2.28-20.36; P = 0.030) were risk factors for COVID-19 inpatients with assisted ventilation.
The older age, tachypnea, and gastrointestinal infections showing as diarrhea, elevated ALT, and elevated white blood cells, procalcitonin and C-reactive protein were risk factors for COVID-19 inpatients with assisted ventilation. Investigating and monitoring these factors could help clinicians identify patients with poor prognosis at an early stage and take proactive assisted ventilation to benefit patients.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

References

PubMed