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Genotype analysis of noroviruses associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in childcare centres, Victoria, Australia, 2012-2015.

Genotype analysis of noroviruses associated with gastroenteritis outbreaks in childcare centres, Victoria, Australia, 2012-2015.
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Bruggink LD, Moselen JM, Marshall JA,


Bruggink LD, Moselen JM, Marshall JA, (click to view)

Bruggink LD, Moselen JM, Marshall JA,

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Epidemiology and infection 2017 04 11145(9) 1933-1941 doi 10.1017/S0950268817000681
Abstract

The characteristics of norovirus outbreaks in children (0-5 years) in childcare centres in Victoria, Australia (2012-2015) were examined. The three most common open reading frame (ORF) 2 genotypes in childcare centre outbreaks were GII.4 (42%), GII.6 (21%) and GII.3 (14%); the remaining genotypes (GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.8, GI.13, GII.1, GII.2, GII.7 and GII.13) each made up <10%. The GII.4 genotype was the only norovirus genotype seen in all 4 years of the study and was the most common genotype in 2012-2014 but in 2015 the most common genotype was GII.2. The GII.4 genotype was more common in children 0-2 years, whereas GII.2 and GII.7 were more common in children 4-5 years. ORF 1/ORF 2 recombinant forms identified were GII.P4_NewOrleans_2009/GII.4_Sydney_2012, GII.P12/GII.3, GII.Pb (GII.21)/GII.3, GII.Pe/GII.2, GII.Pe/GII.4_Sydney_2012 and GII.Pg/GII.1. The findings indicate that norovirus genotype prevalence patterns in children were influenced by the age of the children and the year in which the analysis was carried out. The majority of norovirus infections (84%) occurred after the first year of life so that vaccination before the age of one would appear to be the most efficacious.

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