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High Rate of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigenemia Among People Living with HIV/AIDS in Kakuri, Kaduna State, North West Nigeria.

High Rate of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigenemia Among People Living with HIV/AIDS in Kakuri, Kaduna State, North West Nigeria.
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Omatola CA, Onoja BA, Thomas T,


Omatola CA, Onoja BA, Thomas T, (click to view)

Omatola CA, Onoja BA, Thomas T,

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Viral immunology 2017 04 28() doi 10.1089/vim.2016.0163

Abstract

Globally, increased incidence of liver disease caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for high morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. This is because both viruses share common routes of transmission. We determined prevalence of HBV-HIV coinfection and the influence of some risk factors on concomitant infection among people living with HIV in a treatment center in Kakuri, Kaduna State. Two hundred consenting individuals with HIV infection participated in the study. Fifty-seven males and 143 females were screened using commercial hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) rapid membrane-based immunoassay kit (Fastep(™) HBV). Seventeen patients tested positive to HBsAg (8.5%). There were more males (14.0%) than females (6.3%). Patients within 40-49 years of age had more coinfection (20.6%) compared to those older than 50 years who had the least prevalence (2.7%). Age of HBV/HIV coinfection was statistically significant (p = 0.02). Risk factors include no knowledge of HBV infection, sharing sharp objects, history of sexually transmitted diseases, history of surgeries, and no HBV immunization. High infection rate observed in this study underscores the need for public awareness, to educate people on modes of transmission. Routine screening is advocated for early HBV identification, as this will facilitate reduction of comorbidity and mortality resulting from opportunistic infection. Findings from this study support introduction of HBV vaccination as part of the Expanded Programme on Immunization in Nigeria.

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