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Higher Levels of CYSTATIN C in HIV/AIDS Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.

Higher Levels of CYSTATIN C in HIV/AIDS Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.
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Dragović G, Srdić D, Musalhi KA, Soldatović I, Kušić J, Jevtović D, Nair D,


Dragović G, Srdić D, Musalhi KA, Soldatović I, Kušić J, Jevtović D, Nair D, (click to view)

Dragović G, Srdić D, Musalhi KA, Soldatović I, Kušić J, Jevtović D, Nair D,

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Basic & clinical pharmacology & toxicology 2017 10 11() doi 10.1111/bcpt.12919

Abstract

Data about Cystatin-C levels in HIV-infected patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible correlations of serum levels of Cystatin-C in HIV/AIDS patients treated with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with or without MetS. This cross-sectional study included 89 HIV/AIDS Caucasian patients receiving cART at the HIV/AIDS Centre Belgrade, Serbia, divided into two groups according to the presence of MetS. Cystatin-C and other biochemical parameters were measured using Cytokine-Array-I, Metabolic-Array-I and Metabolic-Array-II, at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Free Hospital and University College London, United Kingdom. A linear regression model was performed in order to evaluate which clinical and laboratory variables had an independent effect on Cystatin-C levels in HIV/AIDS patients. There were 33 (37%) patients with MetS and 56 (63%) without MetS. Patients with and without MetS were homogenous for age, duration of cART, number of cART combinations and CD4(+) T-cell count. Statistically increased Cystatin-C levels were observed in HIV/AIDS patients with MetS (p = 0.017), when compared to patients without MetS. Data showed a positive correlation of Cystatin-C and C-reactive protein (r = 0.349, p = 0.001). Using linear regression modelling, significant correlations were obtained between Cystatin-C and MetS in univariate analysis (p < 0.001). Cystatin-C levels were significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients with MetS versus without MetS. Early assessment of metabolic syndrome using Cystatin-C as a marker, may ultimately help increase the lifespan of HIV/AIDS patients, since these patients appear to be at high risk of cardiovascular diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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